Proper 7(C): Healing from a Place of Strength

Proper 7(C): Healing from a Place of Strength

Luke 8:26-39

By: The Rev. David Clifford

The scripture for Proper 7 offers an example of Jesus’ power over the scary world in which we live in his calming of the storm in verses 22-25. In this scripture, we are told the story of Jesus healing the demon-possessed Gerasene. This scripture reveals to us that Jesus not only has power over the natural world, but over the spiritual as well. We serve a Lord that wants healing for us physically, emotionally, spiritually. We serve a Lord that wants healing for our community and world. There are a few details to this particular scripture I would like to highlight.

While reading through commentaries on this particular scripture, there are two things that stand out to me. The first is that this Gerasene man highlights Jesus’ desire to minister to the world beyond Israel. Many within the church think of ministry to the Gentiles as beginning with Paul. However, this scripture (and many others) clearly shows that Jesus ministered to all groups and types of people. The Church, especially in today’s political and cultural climate, could be reminded of the inclusivity of Jesus’ ministry and his focus on the outcasts.

The second thing that really stands out to me from many of the commentaries are the ways in which so many biblical thinkers compare the demon’s that have possessed this man to the mental health struggles that so many face in our culture today. Personally, I believe there to be some similarities between the ways in which Jesus deals with demons in the scriptures and the ways mental health professionals deal with the mental challenges so many deal with in their own lives. However, we must be careful in the comparisons we make between the two.

It would be inappropriate and insensitive to equate the two and speak of mental health issues as being possessed by demons. In fact, in the history of the church, we have often done more harm than good in equating mental health issues to demon possession. Many in the church have read this scripture literally and believe that Jesus is the only cure to mental health issues. Many in the church have wrongly suggested that those needing mental health services to avoid the medical professionals in preference for prayer and the spiritual work of Jesus. We must acknowledge that this story (like all of scripture) is more complex than we might first acknowledge. In one moment, Jesus is healing this man physically, emotionally, and spiritually. All parts of the individual are important and we must honor each part of this man Luke describes in this explanation of Jesus’ wholistic approach to health, healing, and ministry.

I would highlight the strength of this individual in dealing with the “Legion” of demons. Many times, when individuals face their own demons (whatever they be), many experience a sense of weakness in receiving help and treatment. One of the things our society has done well is shaming folks for their own struggles. Jesus does not shame this individual. Instead, Jesus offers healing and peace. In a strange twist, Jesus does not even shame the demons. In fact, he honors their request to not go into the Abyss.

Jesus sends the demons into a herd of pigs, who immediately rush into the lake a drown (verse 33). I wonder what it would like to honor the man’s strength for dealing with the demons while continuing to live. The true testament to this man’s strength is that he had dealt with these demons “for a long time” (verse 27). There is no weakness in searching for help in our healing. In fact, we should commend folks for their strength in continually dealing with demons that would send us to drown in a lake.

After this miraculous healing, Luke tells of the witnesses that experienced this “new man” who is now so different: he is sitting at Jesus’ feet, is clothed, and in his right mind (verse 35). The crowd and the town are in fear because of this healing. In many respects, this begs us to question about the healing that we must each go through from our own fear and anxiety. We must each witness to the grace of Jesus in spite of our fear and anxiety in the world in which we live. I believe we are each called to witness to the strength of those on the outskirts of society, even (and especially) if society tells us and them how weak they truly are. We must honor the strength that it takes to deal with demons, just as we honor the strength it takes to exorcise demons (whether that be done physically, emotionally, or spiritually).

In fact, such witness is exactly what Jesus commands of the man when he begs to go with Jesus. “Return home and tell how much God has done for you” (verse 39, NIV). I invite you this week to join me in witnessing to the strength of God that can be found in the strength of all those who struggle daily with their own demons. We can be encouraged by this nameless man in scripture because of his own strength and the reality that Christ joins in our own strength to heal us in all of our aspects as creation and humanity.

 

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The Rev. David Clifford

The Rev. David Clifford is an ordained minister in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and serves as the Senior Minister of Westmont Christian Church in Lubbock Texas, where he lives with his wife and three children.

 

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